• Adani tries to get things moving at Carmichael coalmine
Adani tries to get things moving at Carmichael coalmine
21 Dec, 2018, 1 Comment

Summary: After eight years of politically charged protest that dominated Australia’s environmental debate, heavy earth-breaking machinery has finally arrived at the site of the nation’s most hotly contested open-cut coalmine.....

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The bulldozers, graders and service vehicles were sent yes­terday to the site of Adani’s Carmichael mine in Queensland’s Galilee Basin — a massive, untapped­ coal province geolo­gists say could yield more than 27 billion tonnes and potenti­ally employing 15,000 coalminers across six projects.


The Indian conglomerate expect­s to deliver up to 27.5 million tonnes from Carmichael to port each year via a purpose-built rail link that while less ambitious than first planned, needs no taxpayer subsidies or external financ­e.


Adani’s Jacine Reading and Brenton Watts at the Labona Camp. Picture: Cameron Laird


Adani’s Jacine Reading and Brenton Watts at the Labona Camp. Picture: Cameron Laird


However, Adani chief executive Lucas Dow said yesterday the mine was being frustrated by the state government, which has delaye­d crucial paperwork approvin­g plans to protec­t ground­water and the endan­gered black-throated finch.


“It feels very much like now, at the 11th hour, the goalposts have been shifted,” he told The Australian. “We have jumped through every environmental condition and hurdle that’s been stipulated and effectively only unwarranted or misplaced government intervention will stop us. The reality is right now the state government is standing in the way of jobs for ­regional Queensland and in par­ticular people in Rockhampton and Townsville.”


State Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch, who met Adani representatives yesterday, said her department was assessing Adani’s plans “on the best available ­science”.



“These decisions are made free of political interference — that’s how we protect the integrity of our environmental laws,” she said.


The trucks line up at Labona Camp yesterday. Picture: Cameron Laird


The trucks line up at Labona Camp yesterday. Picture: Cameron Laird


The Environment Department said there was “no statutory time­frame” within which it had to ­approve management plans. It said the finch plan was being examined by an independent scientific panel, while Adani’s groundwater plan still needed to “identify the source aquifer of the Doongmabulla Springs complex and mitigation measures to protect the springs”.


The department was also awaiting independent scientific advice commissioned by the federa­l government from CSIRO and Geoscience Australia before approving the groundwater plan.


Adani’s groundwater plan needs only state government approval in the short term. The finch plan has already been approved by the federal government.


Until management plans are approved, Mr Dow said Adani would begin work on its railway, which could be used by other ­miners including Gina Rinehart’s GVK Hancock, Clive Palmer’s Waratah Coal and Chinese firm Macmines.


Anti-coal activists have ramped up their campaign against Adani since the company announced last month it would self-fund the railway. This has includ­ed disrupting public appearances by Bill Shorten and federal Resources Minister Matt Canavan, and pressuring insuran­ce companies to refuse to deal with the company.


 

Jared Owens, 21/12/2018, www.theaustralian.com.au/business/mining-energy/adani-tries-to-get-things-moving-at-carmichael-coalmine/news-story/41676a3d00fff7040aad63f0602d561b

Comments.
  • MyPassion

    Anonymous
    21 Dec, 2018

    This project is good for Queensland and jobs. There is far too much red tape for mining companies in Australia.

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